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Georgia National Parks

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Spotlights


Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area

Chattahoochee River National Recreation AreaThe Recreation Area lies within four counties, north and northeast of downtown Atlanta, Georgia. It consists of 16 land units along a 48-mile stretch of the Chattahoochee River. In addition to providing recreational activities such as fishing, hiking, picnicking, and boating, the park contains a wide variety of natural habitats, flora and fauna, nineteenth century historic sites, and Native American archeological sites.

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Cumberland Island National Seashore

Cumberland Island National SeashoreCumberland Island is 17.5 miles long and totals 36,415 acres of which 16,850 are marsh, mud flats, and tidal creeks. It is well known for its sea turtles, wild turkeys, wild horses, armadillos, abundant shore birds, dune fields, maritime forests, salt marshes, and historic structures. Visit Cumberland Island National Seashore for a natural experience: sun and sand, beautiful vistas and relaxing atmosphere.

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Mountains Atlanta Metro


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Appalachian National Scenic Trail - The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is a 2,167-mile (3,488 km) footpath along the ridge crests and across the major valleys of the Appalachian Mountains from Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in north Georgia. The trail traverses Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia.

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park - Between 1890 and 1899 the Congress of the United States authorized the establishment of the first four national military parks: Chickamauga and Chattanooga, Shiloh, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg. The first and largest of these, and the one upon which the establishment and development of most other national military and historical parks was based, was Chickamauga and Chattanooga.

Trail Of Tears National Historic Trail - In 1838, the United States government forcibly removed more than 16,000 Cherokee Indian people from their homelands in Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, and Georgia, and sent them to Indian Territory (today known as Oklahoma). The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states.

Coast

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Cumberland Island National Seashore - Cumberland Island is 17.5 miles long and totals 36,415 acres of which 16,850 are marsh, mud flats, and tidal creeks. It is well known for its sea turtles, abundant shore birds, dune fields, maritime forest, salt marshes, and historic structures.

Fort Federica National Monument - Established in 1736, the town of Frederica was the southernmost post of the British colonies in North America. It protected the rest of Georgia and South Carolina from the Spanish in Florida. The park is known for it's exceptional beauty. Stately oaks, exceptionally large grape vines, and Spanish moss lend an air of antiquity unequaled on the coast.

Fort Pulaski National Monument - The defining events of Fort Pulaski occurred during the American Civil War. In April of 1862, Union troops directed rifled cannon fire at the fort breaching the southeast angle. The quick success of this experimental cannon surprised military strategists. The accuracy and range of the rifled cannon rendered brick fortifications obsolete. Immediately after capturing the fort, Union Major General David Hunter, an ardent abolitionist, ordered the release of area slaves. Many were recruited into the Union army comprising the First South Carolina Colored Regiment.


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Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area - The Recreation Area lies within four counties, north and northeast of downtown Atlanta, Georgia. It consists of 16 land units along a 48-mile stretch of the Chattahoochee River. In addition to providing recreational activities such as fishing, hiking, picnicking, and boating, the park contains a wide variety of natural habitats, flora and fauna, nineteenth century historic sites, and Native American archeological sites.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park - Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield is a 2,884 acre National Battlefield that preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign.

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site - Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site includes a number of facilities that are operated in partnership with the National Park Service, Ebenezer Baptist Church and The King Center. Within these facilities the visitor can learn about Dr. King's life and and his influence on others.

 
Historic South

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Ocmulgee National Monument - Ocmulgee is a memorial to the antiquity of man in this corner of the North American continent. The National Monument preserves a continuous record of human life in the Southeast from the earliest times to the present. From Ice-Age hunters to the Muscogee (Creek) people of historic times, there is evidence here of 12,000 years of human habitation.

Southern Rivers

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Andersonville National Historic Site - Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. It was built early in 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of Federal prisoners kept in and around Richmond, Virginia, to a place of greater security and a more abundant food supply.  The site is also home to the National P.O.W. Museum.

Jimmy Carter National Historic Site - Few U.S. Presidents have had such close ties with where they were born and raised. The rural southern culture of Plains, Georgia, that revolves around farming, church and school, had a large influence in molding the character and in shaping the political policies of the 39th President of the United States. The site includes President Carterís residence, boyhood farm, school, and the railroad depot, which served as his campaign headquarters during the 1976 election.