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Blackstone Valley Rhode Island

Blackstone River Theater - A cultural arts center where the music, dance and folk arts traditions of the Blackstone River Valley come to life. BRT presents weekly acoustic-based music concerts with an emphasis on the ethnic groups that settled in the Blackstone River Valley, monthly folk dances and children's events, as well as special events on a year-round basis.

Slater Mill Historic Site - Located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, the Slater Mill Historic Site is a museum complex dedicated to the preservation of the American industrial heritage.

The Sandra Feinstein-Gamm Theatre - Come and enjoy some of the best performing arts presentations you will see anywhere.

Stadium Theatre Performing Arts Centre - Renowned for its acoustics, intimacy, and artwork, The Theatre has been a center for performing arts since 1926. When built, no theatre of similar size and class in the country offered musical equipment superior to that of the Stadium. Today, the Stadium Theatre has been full restored to it's original grandeur and offers performances by local, regional and national companies.

Theatre Works - A community theater company located in Woonsocket. Come and join them for a night of great entertainment.

Hearthside - Located just to the north of Providence in Lincoln, Hearthside is a unique stone mansion built in 1810 on pastoral Great Road, the first road through the wilderness between Providence and Mendon, and one of the oldest thoroughfares in America.

Museum of Work & Culture - This interactive museum presents the compelling and touching story of the French Canadians who left the farms of Quebec for the factories of New England. Illustrating a remarkable cultural preservation story of faith, language and customs, the exhibits recreate the unique Woonsocket labor story of the rise of the Independent Textile Union which grew to dominate every aspect of city life.

The Arnold House - Built by Eleazor Arnold in 1693, the Arnold House is a rare surviving example of a "stone-ender," a once common building type with roots found in the western part of England. With a fieldstone end wall and pilastered chimney, the Arnold House was built as a two-and-a-half-story structure with an integral lean-to and four rooms on each floor.